Roger’s Recommends Top 12 Peppers for 2016

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Roger’s Recommends Top 12 Peppers for 2016

If you loved our tomato selection, then you’ll love our pepper selection.  This year’s Top 12 Peppers include the favorite Jalapeños, Anaheim and Sweet bell peppers. We also have a variety of hot, real hot and nuclear hot varieties, including the top 5 hottest peppers in the world.

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Bhut Jolokia “Red Ghost” 

Just the name makes this # 5 ranked pepper scary.  It was the world’s hottest for a short time. Rated at over 1,000,000 Scoville Units.  High yields produce heavily during the summer. Red and horribly wrinkled fruit will really add spice to any recipe.

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Black Cobra

Long slender 3 inch fruit turns from black to red; and points menacingly upward towards the sky.  Unusual gray, green, hairy foliage makes this a beautiful plant. Hot peppers from 20,000 to 40,000  Scoville unit.

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3

Carolina Reaper

Currently the world’s hottest pepper according to Guinness Book of World Records.  Nuclear hot pepper rated from 1,500,000 to 2,200,000 Scoville units.  2 inch red wrinkles fruit shows a bloused tip on a large and highly productive plant.

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Chili Negro de Arbor

Hot pepper that grows into a tree as tall as 4 feet.  Attractive gray-green foliage with black peppers that point skyward similar to Goat’s Weed Peppers.  Hot pepper rated at 250,000 Scoville units.

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5

Datil

A Habanero cousin. This pepper produces high yields of yellow-orange fruit to 3 ½ inches long.  This hot pepper has an interesting history from its origin and how it arrived in the U.S.  Rated from 100,000 to 300,000 Scoville units.

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Fatalii

The perfectly named pepper. A Habanero type pepper that originated in South Africa.  This pepper is highly productive on a bush that grows to 3 inches high.  Arrowhead shaped fruit is 1 to 2 inches long.  This fruit has a unique citrus flavor profile over the traditional smoky flavor profile. A Steve Goto #1 recommendation.

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Fish Pepper

With the same look and shape of a Serrano pepper, the fruit and plant foliage differs with a striped coloration which resembles a fish.  The plant foliage is beautifully variegated and can be grown as a standalone potted plant.  Mild fruit is rated at 10,000 Scoville units.

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Lemon Drop

Highly productive 3 inch long yellow fruit grows on a smaller plant but provides a fresh citrus flavor profile.  Its smaller bush size is a great pepper plant for containers. This pepper was one of the favorites at the 2015 Tomato Tasting.

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Seven Pot Douglah

Produces large dark brown to purple wrinkled fruit. It is noted as one of the best flavored peppers available.  Highly productive and rated the #3 hottest pepper in the world at over 1,800,000 Scoville units.

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Tree Habanero

A large perennial tree that produces pointed 1 inch sized fruit that point skyward like angry missiles. From the mountains in Mexico, this plant is highly productive and can live for several years.  Great for planting in large containers.  Hot pepper with a mild smoky flavor. It’s rated at 350,000 Scoville units.

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11

Trinidad Scorpion Butch “T”

A large red wrinkled fruit up to 2 inches long.  This fruit has an angry point and is highly productive.  Short lived as the hottest pepper in the world, as it was beat by the Trinidad Scorpion “Moraga” and the Carolina Reaper. Currently the #3 hottest pepper at over 1,500,00 Scoville units.

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Trinidad Scorpion “Moruga”

Similar to the Trinidad Scorpion Butch “T,” this pepper is rated the #2 pepper in the world. Extremely prolific and great in containers.  Heat rated at over 1,700,00 Scoville units.

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By | 2016-03-03T15:45:18+00:00 March 3rd, 2016|Food, Gardening|0 Comments

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