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'Lavender - Fernleaf'
Lavandula pinnata

Lavender - Fernleaf

Season: All Year



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The genus includes annual or short-lived herbaceous perennial plants, and shrub-like perennials, subshrubs or small shrubs.

Leaf shape is diverse across the genus. They are simple in some commonly cultivated species; in other species, they are pinnately toothed, or pinnate, sometimes multiple pinnate and dissected. In most species, the leaves are covered in fine hairs or indumentum, which normally contain essential oils.

Flowers are contained in whorls, held on spikes rising above the foliage, the spikes being branched in some species. Some species produce colored bracts at the tips of the inflorescences. The flowers may be blue, violet, or lilac in the wild species, occasionally blackish purple or yellowish. The Sepal calyx is tubular. The corolla is also tubular, usually with five lobes (the upper lip often cleft, and the lower lip has two clefts).



Line Spacer Herb Height
  Mature Height
  36 Inches
Line Spacer Herb Width
Mature Width
24 Inches
Line Spacer Herb Light
Light
Sun
Line Spacer Herb Water
Water
Low


Herb Uses

Uses
Commercially, the plant is grown mainly for the production of lavender essential oil. English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) yields an oil with sweet overtones and can be used in balms, salves, perfumes, cosmetics, and topical applications. Lavandula × intermedia, also known as lavandin or Dutch lavender, hybrids of L. angustifolia and L. latifolia. Are widely cultivated for commercial use since their flowers tend to be bigger than those of English lavender and the plants tend to be easier to harvest. They yield a similar essential oil, but with higher levels of terpenes including camphor, which add a sharper overtone to the fragrance, regarded by some as of lower quality than that of English lavender.

The US Food and Drug Administration considers lavender as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for human consumption. The essential oil was used in hospitals during World War I.

Herb information provided by Wikipedia, which is released under the
Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0




Herb Uses

RECIPES

Light & Buttery Lavender Shortbreads

Ingredients
1 cup butter softened
3/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
½ teaspoon almond extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers (preferably organic)
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter, sugar, and extracts. Whip until light and fluffy.

2. Next, add the flour, salt and dried lavender buds and mix until completely combined. The dough should be soft and easy to handle. If the dough is still sticky, add a little more flour 1/8 cup at a time until you can form a dough ball without it sticking.

3. Divide the dough into two balls. Flatten into a disc, wrap with plastic or wax paper and chill in the refrigerator for about one hour. You can speed up chilling time by placing the dough into the freezer for 20 to 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 325° F degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to about to 1/4-1/2 inch thickness depending on preference and then cut cookies out using the cookie cutter of your choice. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet (parchment paper is okay).

5. Bake 10-13 minutes or until cookies are gently browned around the edges. Allow to cool on a rack. Enjoy!

Lavender - Fernleaf
Season: All Year



Looking for a Specific Herb?
Search Our Herb Almanac Below:



The genus includes annual or short-lived herbaceous perennial plants, and shrub-like perennials, subshrubs or small shrubs.

Leaf shape is diverse across the genus. They are simple in some commonly cultivated species; in other species, they are pinnately toothed, or pinnate, sometimes multiple pinnate and dissected. In most species, the leaves are covered in fine hairs or indumentum, which normally contain essential oils.

Flowers are contained in whorls, held on spikes rising above the foliage, the spikes being branched in some species. Some species produce colored bracts at the tips of the inflorescences. The flowers may be blue, violet, or lilac in the wild species, occasionally blackish purple or yellowish. The Sepal calyx is tubular. The corolla is also tubular, usually with five lobes (the upper lip often cleft, and the lower lip has two clefts).



Herb Height
  Mature Height
  36 Inches
Line Spacer
Herb Width
Mature Width
24 Inches
Line Spacer
Herb Light
Light
Sun
Line Spacer
Herb Water
Water
Low


Uses
Commercially, the plant is grown mainly for the production of lavender essential oil. English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) yields an oil with sweet overtones and can be used in balms, salves, perfumes, cosmetics, and topical applications. Lavandula × intermedia, also known as lavandin or Dutch lavender, hybrids of L. angustifolia and L. latifolia. Are widely cultivated for commercial use since their flowers tend to be bigger than those of English lavender and the plants tend to be easier to harvest. They yield a similar essential oil, but with higher levels of terpenes including camphor, which add a sharper overtone to the fragrance, regarded by some as of lower quality than that of English lavender.

The US Food and Drug Administration considers lavender as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) for human consumption. The essential oil was used in hospitals during World War I.

Herb information provided by Wikipedia, which is released under the
Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0




RECIPES

Light & Buttery Lavender Shortbreads

Ingredients
1 cup butter softened
3/4 cup sugar
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
½ teaspoon almond extract
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon dried lavender flowers (preferably organic)
1/2 teaspoon salt

Directions
1. In the bowl of an electric mixer with the paddle attachment, cream together the butter, sugar, and extracts. Whip until light and fluffy.

2. Next, add the flour, salt and dried lavender buds and mix until completely combined. The dough should be soft and easy to handle. If the dough is still sticky, add a little more flour 1/8 cup at a time until you can form a dough ball without it sticking.

3. Divide the dough into two balls. Flatten into a disc, wrap with plastic or wax paper and chill in the refrigerator for about one hour. You can speed up chilling time by placing the dough into the freezer for 20 to 30 minutes.

4. Preheat oven to 325° F degrees. On a lightly floured surface, roll out dough to about to 1/4-1/2 inch thickness depending on preference and then cut cookies out using the cookie cutter of your choice. Place on an ungreased cookie sheet (parchment paper is okay).

5. Bake 10-13 minutes or until cookies are gently browned around the edges. Allow to cool on a rack. Enjoy!