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'Sorrel - French'
Rumex scutatus

Sorrel - French

Season: Fall - Spring



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Sorrel is a slender herbaceous perennial plant about 60 centimetres (24 inches) high, with roots that run deep into the ground, as well as juicy stems and arrow-shaped (sagittate) leaves. The lower leaves are 7 to 15 cm (3 to 6 in) in length with long petioles and a membranous ocrea formed of fused, sheathing stipules. The upper ones are sessile, and frequently become crimson. It has whorled spikes of reddish-green flowers, which bloom in early summer, becoming purplish. The species is dioecious, with stamens and pistils on different plants.



Line Spacer Herb Height
  Mature Height
  36 Inches
Line Spacer Herb Width
Mature Width
24 Inches
Line Spacer Herb Light
Light
Half Sun
Line Spacer Herb Water
Water
High


Herb Uses

Uses
Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves are edible when young but toughen with age; they may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salad. The plant has a distinct sharp, sour taste. It contains oxalic acid, which can be poisonous in high quantities.

In India, the leaves are used in soups or curries made with yellow lentils and peanuts. In Afghanistan, the leaves are coated in a wet batter and deep fried, then served as an appetizer or if in season during Ramadan, for breaking the fast. In Armenia, the leaves are collected in spring, woven into braids, and dried for use during winter. The most common preparation is aveluk soup, where the leaves are re-hydrated and rinsed to reduce bitterness, then stewed with onions, potatoes, walnuts, garlic and bulgur wheat or lentils, and sometimes sour plums.

Herb information provided by Wikipedia, which is released under the
Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0




Herb Uses

RECIPES

Caribbean Sorrel Drink

Ingredients
• 2 cups dried sorrel
• 10 cups water
• 3 cinnamon sticks
• 4 star anise, whole
• 2 pieces orange peel, fresh (2-3 inches)
• 2 tsp white sugar, or more (to taste)

Instructions
• Combine all ingredients, except the sugar, in a large pot.

• Gently simmer for about 10 minutes, then remove from heat. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 30 minutes, up to 2 hours to infuse.

• Strain the mixture into a glass pitcher. Set in fridge to chill.

• When ready to serve, sweeten and/or dilute the mixture to your preference. Serve over ice.

• Store unused portion in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. It is normal to see some sediment in the bottle after a few days.

Sorrel - French
Season: Fall - Spring



Looking for a Specific Herb?
Search Our Herb Almanac Below:



Sorrel is a slender herbaceous perennial plant about 60 centimetres (24 inches) high, with roots that run deep into the ground, as well as juicy stems and arrow-shaped (sagittate) leaves. The lower leaves are 7 to 15 cm (3 to 6 in) in length with long petioles and a membranous ocrea formed of fused, sheathing stipules. The upper ones are sessile, and frequently become crimson. It has whorled spikes of reddish-green flowers, which bloom in early summer, becoming purplish. The species is dioecious, with stamens and pistils on different plants.



Herb Height
  Mature Height
  36 Inches
Line Spacer
Herb Width
Mature Width
24 Inches
Line Spacer
Herb Light
Light
Half Sun
Line Spacer
Herb Water
Water
High


Uses
Common sorrel has been cultivated for centuries. The leaves are edible when young but toughen with age; they may be puréed in soups and sauces or added to salad. The plant has a distinct sharp, sour taste. It contains oxalic acid, which can be poisonous in high quantities.

In India, the leaves are used in soups or curries made with yellow lentils and peanuts. In Afghanistan, the leaves are coated in a wet batter and deep fried, then served as an appetizer or if in season during Ramadan, for breaking the fast. In Armenia, the leaves are collected in spring, woven into braids, and dried for use during winter. The most common preparation is aveluk soup, where the leaves are re-hydrated and rinsed to reduce bitterness, then stewed with onions, potatoes, walnuts, garlic and bulgur wheat or lentils, and sometimes sour plums.

Herb information provided by Wikipedia, which is released under the
Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0




RECIPES

Caribbean Sorrel Drink

Ingredients
• 2 cups dried sorrel
• 10 cups water
• 3 cinnamon sticks
• 4 star anise, whole
• 2 pieces orange peel, fresh (2-3 inches)
• 2 tsp white sugar, or more (to taste)

Instructions
• Combine all ingredients, except the sugar, in a large pot.

• Gently simmer for about 10 minutes, then remove from heat. Allow the mixture to sit for at least 30 minutes, up to 2 hours to infuse.

• Strain the mixture into a glass pitcher. Set in fridge to chill.

• When ready to serve, sweeten and/or dilute the mixture to your preference. Serve over ice.

• Store unused portion in the fridge for up to 2 weeks. It is normal to see some sediment in the bottle after a few days.